Press "Enter" to skip to content

Ancient Greece Can Tell Us Something About Pandemics

Thucydides offers us a description of a city-state in crisis that is as poignant and powerful now, as it was in 430 B.C.

By Chris Mackie, Professor of Classics, La Trobe University

Thucydides’ account of the plague that struck Athens in 430 B.C. focuses on the social response, both of those who died and those who survived.

The coronavirus is concentrating our minds on the fragility of human existence in the face of a deadly disease. Words like “epidemic” and “pandemic” (and “panic”!) have become part of our daily discourse.

These words are Greek in origin, and they point to the fact that the Greeks of antiquity thought a lot about disease, both in its purely medical sense, and as a metaphor for the broader conduct of human affairs. What the Greeks called the “plague” (loimos) features in some memorable passages in Greek literature.

Read all about it here…

Be First to Comment

Leave a Reply

DISCLAIMER: The photos used on this site are owned by the originators of the featured posts and the Matrix Gazette claims no rights or ownership of them.
The custom illustrations by Tom White however are copyrighted and owned by the Matrix Gazette and may not be used without expressed written consent.



Website Hosting and Digital Marketing by:

8th Domain Technology